{"metadata":{"image":[],"title":"","description":""},"api":{"url":"","auth":"never","results":{"codes":[]},"params":[]},"next":{"description":"","pages":[]},"title":"Log Analysis Quick Start","type":"basic","slug":"log-analysis-quick-start","excerpt":"","body":"Spatineo Monitor analyzes log files from your spatial web service and give you analytics and reports based on this information. The analysis is based on log files from your spatial web service. \n\nThe goal of this guide is to give you analytics of your services in Spatineo Monitor during your trial.\n[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"Step 1: which server?\"\n}\n[/block]\nYou can skip this step if you have a server setup where there are no intermediate servers between the server hosting your spatial web service and the internet.\n\nMany organisations however have separate internet facing servers that direct traffic to backend servers hosting the actual spatial web services. In these cases, often the best log files for analysis are the ones on the internet facing server. If however the log files on this server cannot be accessed for any reason, you can go ahead and use the logs on the backend server.\n[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"Step 2: which files?\"\n}\n[/block]\nOnce you know which server to get the log files from, you need to identify the actual files.\nThe table below lists the default directories for most common operating system and web server combinations. In most cases, you should be able to find the files from these default directories.\n[block:parameters]\n{\n  \"data\": {\n    \"h-0\": \"Server OS / Web server\",\n    \"h-1\": \"Default directory\",\n    \"h-2\": \"Default file names\",\n    \"0-0\": \"Windows / IIS\",\n    \"0-1\": \"C:\\\\inetpub\\\\logs\\\\LogFiles\",\n    \"0-2\": \"u_ex*.log\",\n    \"1-0\": \"Debian or Ubuntu / apache2\",\n    \"1-1\": \"/var/log/apache2\",\n    \"1-2\": \"access.log*\",\n    \"2-0\": \"Debian or Ubuntu / nginx\",\n    \"2-1\": \"/var/log/nginx\",\n    \"2-2\": \"access.log*\",\n    \"3-0\": \"Red Hat or CentOS / apache2\",\n    \"3-1\": \"/var/log/apache2/\",\n    \"3-2\": \"access.log*\",\n    \"4-2\": \"access.log*\",\n    \"4-0\": \"Red Hat or CentOS / nginx\",\n    \"4-1\": \"/var/log/nginx\"\n  },\n  \"cols\": 3,\n  \"rows\": 5\n}\n[/block]\nIf you don't find files in these directories, try searching for files matching the file names for the server you're using. If all else fails, you can always ask your system administrator.\n[block:api-header]\n{\n  \"type\": \"basic\",\n  \"title\": \"Step 3: send the files to Spatineo\"\n}\n[/block]\nOne you've located the directory with the files, grab the files covering the past week. Analytics for the previous week will give you a good impression on the analytics features of Spatineo Monitor.\n\nYou will be able to see which log files cover the past week by looking at the time stamps and the names of the files. If unsure, you can always take a peek into the log file – the logs are just text files and the timestamps for each request are human readable.\n\nOnce you have the right files, you can go ahead and email the log files to your contact at Spatineo.\n[block:callout]\n{\n  \"type\": \"info\",\n  \"title\": \"PS.\",\n  \"body\": \"When you subscribe to Spatineo Monitor, this will all be automated and you will not have to worry about sending us individual log files by email.\"\n}\n[/block]","updates":[],"order":11,"isReference":false,"hidden":false,"sync_unique":"","link_url":"","link_external":false,"_id":"5ccaf606c63d3c013b50f6bb","category":{"sync":{"isSync":false,"url":""},"pages":[],"title":"Spatineo Monitor","slug":"spatineo-monitor","order":1,"from_sync":false,"reference":false,"_id":"5ccaf606c63d3c013b50f6a7","version":"5ccaf606c63d3c013b50f6bc","project":"544f6e49698ab40800b4f41e","createdAt":"2014-10-28T12:09:37.513Z","__v":0},"project":"544f6e49698ab40800b4f41e","user":"544f6e19cf9f86080080129a","version":{"version":"3.13","version_clean":"3.13.0","codename":"","is_stable":true,"is_beta":false,"is_hidden":false,"is_deprecated":false,"categories":["5ccaf606c63d3c013b50f6a6","5ccaf606c63d3c013b50f6a7","5ccaf606c63d3c013b50f6a8"],"_id":"5ccaf606c63d3c013b50f6bc","project":"544f6e49698ab40800b4f41e","__v":0,"forked_from":"5a5879a7086a05001c4317ac","createdAt":"2018-01-12T09:02:31.335Z","releaseDate":"2018-01-12T09:02:31.335Z"},"createdAt":"2014-10-28T12:10:06.204Z","githubsync":"","__v":0}

Log Analysis Quick Start


Spatineo Monitor analyzes log files from your spatial web service and give you analytics and reports based on this information. The analysis is based on log files from your spatial web service. The goal of this guide is to give you analytics of your services in Spatineo Monitor during your trial. [block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "Step 1: which server?" } [/block] You can skip this step if you have a server setup where there are no intermediate servers between the server hosting your spatial web service and the internet. Many organisations however have separate internet facing servers that direct traffic to backend servers hosting the actual spatial web services. In these cases, often the best log files for analysis are the ones on the internet facing server. If however the log files on this server cannot be accessed for any reason, you can go ahead and use the logs on the backend server. [block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "Step 2: which files?" } [/block] Once you know which server to get the log files from, you need to identify the actual files. The table below lists the default directories for most common operating system and web server combinations. In most cases, you should be able to find the files from these default directories. [block:parameters] { "data": { "h-0": "Server OS / Web server", "h-1": "Default directory", "h-2": "Default file names", "0-0": "Windows / IIS", "0-1": "C:\\inetpub\\logs\\LogFiles", "0-2": "u_ex*.log", "1-0": "Debian or Ubuntu / apache2", "1-1": "/var/log/apache2", "1-2": "access.log*", "2-0": "Debian or Ubuntu / nginx", "2-1": "/var/log/nginx", "2-2": "access.log*", "3-0": "Red Hat or CentOS / apache2", "3-1": "/var/log/apache2/", "3-2": "access.log*", "4-2": "access.log*", "4-0": "Red Hat or CentOS / nginx", "4-1": "/var/log/nginx" }, "cols": 3, "rows": 5 } [/block] If you don't find files in these directories, try searching for files matching the file names for the server you're using. If all else fails, you can always ask your system administrator. [block:api-header] { "type": "basic", "title": "Step 3: send the files to Spatineo" } [/block] One you've located the directory with the files, grab the files covering the past week. Analytics for the previous week will give you a good impression on the analytics features of Spatineo Monitor. You will be able to see which log files cover the past week by looking at the time stamps and the names of the files. If unsure, you can always take a peek into the log file – the logs are just text files and the timestamps for each request are human readable. Once you have the right files, you can go ahead and email the log files to your contact at Spatineo. [block:callout] { "type": "info", "title": "PS.", "body": "When you subscribe to Spatineo Monitor, this will all be automated and you will not have to worry about sending us individual log files by email." } [/block]